Thursday, July 17, 2014

21st Century Rules of Political Science (The Ugly Truth of the Actual Physics of Moving Modern People)


Highlights from a Twitter Series:
21st Century Rules of Political Science
(The Ugly Truth of the Actual Physics of Moving Modern People)

Now, if you have been following my Twitter feed (Don’t laugh some folks do), then you’ll recognize I have been putting out a series of little corny koans on the way the political process looks from the ground level of being a very public liberal in a pugnaciously angry red state.

&, of course, from the perspective of being a smart-ass.



Though my work predates the Internet and my now suspended blog probably contains more typos than true wisdom, for about 25 years I claimed to be a humor writer before becoming a candidate in 2012 and published a couple hundred political humor columns in a series I called "Current Comedy that started before the 90s. And every one of them was simply preparation for the challenge of communicating the world of politics in 140 characters. Yes I'm squawking about Twitter.

Now when I first learned of the world of the little blue bird and hyper-communication in telegraph length prose I railed against it. I dug a little just now and found my first mention of Twitter back in my “4/20” column from April of 2009. At the time, I was apparently ready to dismiss it as as vile internet fad as “two girls and a cup.” I railed against the way it creates a short hand of spelling and meaning that would ultimately distort English as we know it.

Four thousand one hundred and seventy-three Tweets later, I am now, quite obviously, a total Twit-aholic and truly do believe that in the world of 21st century politics, the activist, the candidate, even the observer are continuingly the stars of our own show on the internet. We have a responsibility to entertain as well as enlighten and enlighten means more than just beat into mind-numbed submission w an encyclopedic, though depressing, array of facts and figures.

The people already know the world sucks, we owe them more than merely reminding them. As leaders, lovers, parents teachers and statesmen, we owe our kinsman more than that. This challenge has always been the challenge for the candidate but in the age of technology we inhabit, we can do so much more than ever before to create, promote and honor the pageants the people use to erect their own frames for thinking about politics. We create a being for others to interact w and thus “become,” in a world that is little more that blinking lights, comments and likes. More and more, our society is an internet society. Having seen the revolution our cyber-space community has made on the way politicians operate w each  other and w the larger public I believe that like in Egypt, a revolution can be fomented in 140 characters and a teenager in Meadview can make a meme to change the minds of millions in the course of one evening.

So, in preparing to make a speech to the Tempe gathering of an organization called Drinking Liberally, rather the bring out the sober sounding policy statements or the impassioned prose of pathos that turns out to simply be pathetic pleas for money, I thought I would spring these ditties on the unsuspecting public. Yes, ladies and gentlemen, I am about to attempt to be the first politician to ever spit out a speech devised entirely from stringing tweets together. I will probably be the last one to attempt this parlor trick as well.
Bloviation from twitter-bation? It could work.

Now since this blog post serves as notes for a speech and is not the speech itself. I am presenting the entire list of twitter posted rules, starring the ones I intend to share and highlighting a few topics I intend to expand on. When you read the list, like my presumed readers in the world wide inter-webs of the twitter-verse, please keep in mind I do actually know how to spell and have consciously chosen to embrace the shorthand possibilities of saying as much as 1 can as briefly as possible.

NSFW! GL!


1.      21st century politics #1 If a tree falls in the forest and no one tweets an Instagram of it to their Facebook, who gives a f***?
2.      21st century politics # 2 You can’t know where the line is, if you don’t cross it sometimes.
3.      21st century politics #3 Don't act like you're above gossip or it'll be about YOU instead. Remember EVERYONE n politics is still 13yrs old.
4.      21st century politics #4 EVER into the Public. When faced w a choice, talk to the most people, the more potentially embarrassing the better.
5.      21st century politics #5 Call them on their Bullshit, but don’t bullshit about your own calling or folks’ll want the scoop on u2.
6.      21st century politics #6 Don’t forget the power of your oppression. The public can’t share your glory, but you must share their pain 2 end it.
7.      21st century politics #7 Thou Shalt Not Be a Train Wreck in Public.
8.      21st century politics #8 Be the biggest person in the room.
9.      21st century politics #9 Your supporters want to believe in you … let them.
10.  21st century politics #10 Tell the Right, they’re wrong … not your volunteers, not your allies.
11.  21st century politics #11 Let your opponents create your no’s, not your doubt.
12.  21st century politics #12 We can't expect 2 bring the world together 2 change 4 good when you can't even stop snipping at your allies.
13.  21st century politics #13 If clicking on a link is too much trouble, you can’t change the world .*
14.  21st century politics #14 Fn cuss or not cuss, speak the language of the people, if your words HAVE to condescend then just shut up.
15.  21st century politics #15 Give up on average or ordinary, only extra-ordinary will get this done.*
16.  21st century politics #16: No one listens, no one reads and they don’t return phone calls. You still have to get it done.
17.  21st century politics #17: Your resume won’t matter if you act like a jerk.*
18.  21st century politics #18 Campaigning is not a full-time job, you only really have to work 8AM-12AM; but sometimes there’s some overtime. (A nod to Mark Twain.)
19.  21st century politics #19 The more complex the process, the more chaotic progress appears. Don’t let the quest for simplification kill the impulse for answers. Many valuable, essential things cannot be reduced to simple terms. Don’t disrespect your topics by expecting to reduce them. Life is SUPPOSED to be complicated.
20.  21st century politics #20 Don’t confuse the beauty of your suffering w the beauty of achieving your goal.*
21.  21st century politics #21 If you can’t persuade your enemies, you must defeat them.
22.  21st century politics #22: when facing the impossible, don't give up, give it more time. What's actually "possible" is shifting all the time.*
23.  21st century politics #23: sure, sometimes think: "u haven't figured out how 2 do u yet & u wanna tell me how 2 do me?" But just keep quiet.*
24.  21st century politics #24: Embrace your ordeals. It's ok to break a sweat sometimes. Stressing your strengths is the only way to build them.*
25.  21st century politics #25: when it comes 2 having 2 fake it, when you just can't be real, your best bet is still trying 2 imitate yourself.
26.  21st century politics #26: while it's cool 2b able 2 explain precisely why you made a mistake, that's not the same as learning from it.*
27.  21st century politics #27: Reject "easy." Don't seek it, don't tell others any task, including your election, will be "easy." Failing is easy. Work!*
28.  21st century politics #28: A leader who only looks out for himself and/or his circle isn't much of a leader.
29.  21st Century politics #29: Ya know how nobody returns calls? Don't be a Nobody. Respect those respectful enough to contact you.
30.  21st century politics #30: The phrase "I never heard of him," reveals a lot more about your ignorance than the other person's accomplishments.*
31.  21st century politics #31: Avoid saying "never" or "always." Except 4 exceptions. The correct response 2 crises is virtually NEVER "do less."*
32.  21st century politics #32: If it’s really about the poetry, you can sleep on the floor sometimes.
33.  21st century politics #33: Real men need to be able to cry. That way we know they can still feel their own hearts and others' pain.
34.  21st century politics #34: when facing the impossible, don't give up, give it more time. What's actually "possible" is shifting all the time.
35.  21st century politics #35: even more important than being generous, b generative. The people look 2 u 2 make stuff happen. Not later, now.
36.  21st century politics #36: Guard ur attention: in general if u pay attention to the news stream for 15 minutes, u'll b pissed off 14 of them.
37.  21st century politics #37: people who talk about their past, things they own or others they "know," instead of the task, aren't helping.
38.  21st century politics #38: if u let others define u then the limits of their imagination is all you will become. Most likely their pawn.
39.  21st century politics #39 : If we all wait for someone else to do it, then we’ll never get it done .

--mikel weisser writes from the Left Coast of AZ 

Monday, July 14, 2014

Democracy for America Questionnaire, Answers 3-5

DFA holds elected officials accountable. If elected, what are your top three policy goals while in office? How will you achieve them? How have you worked to achieve them in the past, both in and out of office? (500 word limit)
My top 3 goals are improved education, improved immigration and reform of existing marijuana laws. While I have many ideas of things I would passionately like to advance (including desalinization projects, rural solar electrification, community arts support, prisoner rights, a Constitutional amendment to end corporate personhood, and so on), these 3 are the areas I have the most experience in and have already been making progress on. In education, as a former lead teacher w a Master in Secondary Ed Instruction, I am profoundly aware of the mess politics has made of our educational system in the last 20 yrs. Class sizes are exploding, course variety and richness has been sacrificed for test driven monotony, amenities are sacrificed, student culture is decidedly anti-educational and declining faster than ever before.
I propose scrapping test driven education and returning to creating whole humans, strong citizens. We can start by at last fully funding federal mandates that cripple school district budgets. Restore electives and vocational ed classes, provide increased nutritional and counseling assistance and stop trying to run education as a for-profit industry. Education is for the good of the public.   America is on a crash course w chaos if we don’t turn the future of education around.
America is a land of immigrants and in the wake of 20th century disastrous military, environmental and business practices, the 21st century world is awash in refugees. The upswing in international refugees is global condition that is just beginning to trend. America is going to have to have a sensible policy for dealing w refugees. We need modern sensible border checkpoints to be able to process refugees the way Ellis Island once did and the professional class who currently are allowed to immigrate also need increased efficiency. Our history of exploiting undocumented immigrants and workers in general is a continuing record of unspoken slavery. Lincoln was right, a country cannot exist half slave and half free. Our 14 Amendment guarantees the rights of “any person,” citizen or no, to equal protection and due process. Immigrants create jobs as consumers, and workers take on the unpleasant work many laborers avoid. I call for a new vision on immigration: if you want to stop illegal immigration, make immigration legal.
Lastly on the issue of cannabis reform, as executive director of my state’s cannabis reform PAC, I am already working day and night to end the horrific cannabis prohibition that has created so much social havoc over the past 80 yrs. The laws were the hatemongering product of crony capitalism at its worst, the preponderance of evidence of the therapeutic use of cannabis is irrefutable and thoroughly researched no matter what the Right will tell you. The social misery caused at home and abroad over America’s War on Drugs is incalculable. It’s time to bring 10s of millions of Americans out of the shadows, embrace “Green Rush” innovation and revenue it promises and halt the momentum of America’s prison-industrial complex, before our government becomes everyone’s jailers.

DFA believes that we have to unite people behind our shared values of community, security and liberty (see Our Values). We must rally behind candidates and causes that share these values and work together to create a more fair and equal society. How will your campaign embody the values of community, security and liberty? (500 word limit)

As an artist, activist and educator, my entire adult life has been about community. Well, the past 25 years of it, anyway. Just before turning 30, after years of dead-end jobs as a construction worker, I joined a food co-op, King Harvest Food Co-op in Springfield, IL and my life was profoundly changed. I had felt a kinship w the activists I had seen on TV, but, having grown up in a rural conservative community, I had not personally met many. As a member of a food co-op, a retail whole foods/health food/new age fashion/activist meeting space, I was exposed to a host of great ideas and exciting lifestyles. Before long I became so involved in the co-op that, during a time when it fell into crisis, I stepped up and took the helm as the co-op store manager. For two years, every member was my boss and each month the will of the board of directors shaped the direction of the storefront and the organization’s activism. This job was the most completely community focused career one could imagine. Our idealism shaped our purpose, we purchased the things we value and took actions on the causes we supported. After two years in this heady milieu, at 30, I left the manager position to return to college to learn how to accomplish even more for the greater good. Later I worked as the volunteer coordinator for a homeless shelter that provided overnight services to 30 people a night and was in part staffed by a cadre of 100+ volunteers. Again the focus was on the community both as a resource and as a need. Then for the past dozen years in Arizona I have again built my life around serving a community’s needs as a teacher and as an arts organizer, I have spent my life imagining what advances the greater good and then focusing on the ground-level nuts and bolts mechanics of turning ideas into action. I wanted to preface my remarks in that context.
The famed anecdote of Franklin aside, security and liberty are not mutually exclusive.  They are both among the promised goals of our American government, insuring domestic tranquility and providing for the common defense are the explicit definitions of national defense and social services. Securing our liberty for now and for the ages is only possible in a world that promotes the general welfare and ensures domestic tranquility. For all people. The truth we see of our current crisis of income inequality is that stripping the masses of their wealth to further enrich the plutocrats does not advance either our security or liberty. Turning our nation into a failed state for off-shored corporate profit does not make America safer.
But calling out the robber barons and rallying the opposition will, just as Americans once rebuffed England’s economically based oppressions. We will all be more secure when we start advancing the good of the public over the profits of predators.
How do you plan to engage the progressive grassroots? Please provide two examples of outreach to the progressive community that your campaign has conducted thus far and elaborate on how you plan to build from there. (500 word limit)
When I filled out this application in 2012 I got to present a couple of rather profound examples of the grassroots enthusiasm we’d built in that cycle.  I’m not sure I can top the disabled guy hitchhiking 35 miles to joining a campaign trip, but one clear way to show the magnitude that our campaign has now reached when it comes to grassroots organizing is to look at my campaign website’s year end blog for 2013. The acknowledgments section includes over 300 names all over the state and the nation. Even my fundraising shows the grassroots nature of my campaign. Though I have admittedly raised under $10,000 last quarter, I have dozens of small dollar donors.
But my favorite example of the grassroots impact I have had in Arizona politics happened just last week. While in Phoenix on other business, I decided to drop in on the monthly DFA meeting. A different congressional candidate was the feature and yet another was already on hand when I arrived. But still when I entered someone called my name and a sustained applause and cheer went up. I have never felt so validated.

Understand, I live 200 miles from PHX and, since moving to AZ in 200, I have always been the little country mouse trying to keep in touch w the politics of the big city, the folks in the know. I have felt like the ambassador from the rural venturing to the city to bring back ideas and resources. I had felt like the small guy at the table trying to watch how the big boys do it. But that applause and cheering showed me that my work on the state level inspires the people who inspire me as well. I want my campaign to be the nexus where rural and urban interests meet for our state. I travel 3-5 days out of every week connecting the local activists to each other and to the state wide Democratic party as well PDA and DFA. Last quarter alone I drove well over ten thousand miles, with only one out of state trip. In May, my district wide final canvass of the petition gathering season lasted 8 days, covered 1224 miles and collected signatures in 22 cities for myself as well as 7 statewide candidates, 8 legislative district candidates and 13 PCs in seven different counties. And we are continuing to work w these candidates and local parties to make the whole movement bigger. AZ can turn blue if we join forces to fix it. Every day we are expanding the circle of activists that attract to our efforts and join our cause by advancing their own personal campaigns for change. That’s about as grassroots as you can get. 

Saturday, July 12, 2014

One Minute Chalk Talk on Net Neutrality

My special thx to Serah Blain & JP Martin from the James Woods for Congress campaign for producing this video. Filmed at the Woods campaign offices in Gilbert, AZ


If YOU would like to help protect Net Neutrality,
http://www.change.org/petitions/fcc-protect-net-neutrality-and-accessibility-for-all

How Far Will I Go to Stop the GOP Menace? (A Second Quarter Travel Log)

Till It is Done, till the wheels fall off, or till I run out of road ...
& then I'll STILL keep walking. 

When I show up at places around the state and start telling people about the miles I spend on the road, I am not always sure they understand just what was involved in attempting to be everywhere at once. Last quarter I again spent more than half of my time traveling and building a community of communities, groups around the state that are working on their own local challenges and ready to join in a Democratic movement to change AZ’s current political universe to build a more progressive future.


The list below is an approximation of how we spent the past 3 months. THX for being part of the experience. Thank you for helping us make AZ change--

1.       4/2-4/3--Golden Valley-Flagstaff-Golden Valley:  323 miles
2.       4/8-4/13--Golden Valley-Apache Junction-PHX-San Tan Valley-Apache Junction-Gilbert-San Tan Valley-Gilbert-Queen Creek-PHX-Mesa-PHX-Apache Junction-Golden Valley: 638 miles
3.       4/14--GV- Kingman-GV: 25 miles
4.       4/15--GV-LHC-GV: 142 miles
5.       4/16--GV-Kingman-GV: 25 miles
6.       4/17-4/21--GV-PHX-Gilbert-Prescott-Tucson-PHX-GV: 889 miles
7.       4/22—GV-BHC-GV: 73 miles
8.       4/23-4/26--GV-Prescott-PHX-Litchfield Park-PHX-Litchfield Park-PHX-Litchfield Park-GV: 546 miles
9.       4/27--GV-Kingman-GV: 25 miles
10.   4/28--GV-Kingman-GV: 25 miles
11.   4/29--GV-Kingman-GV: 25 miles
April Total: 2,746 miles
MAY
12.   5/1-5/2—GV-PHX-Mesa-Gilbert-GV-Kingman-GV: 485 miles
13.   5/3-GV-Gilbert-Apache Junction: 231 miles
14.   5/4-Apache Junction-Chandler-San Tan Valley-Gilbert: 88 miles
15.   5/5—Gilbert-San Tan Valley-Queen Creek-Gilbert-San Tan Valley-Gilbert: 73 miles
16.   5/6—Gilbert-Chandler-Queen Creek-San Tan Valley-Gilbert: 77 miles
17.   5/7-5/9—Gilbert-PHX-Mesa-PHX-Buckeye-Yuma-Parker-GV: 535 miles
18.   5/10—GV-Kingman-GV-Kingman-GV: 48 miles
19.   5/11—GV-Kingman-GV: 35 miles
20.   5/13-5/16—GV-NPHX-PHX-Casa Grande-Arizona City-San Tan Valley-PHX-NPHX-PHX-Black Canyon City-Prescott-GV: 683 miles
21.   5/16-5/18--GV-Kingman-PHX-NPHX-Payson-Flagstaff-Kingman-GV: 562 miles
22.   5/19—GV-Kingman-GV-Kingman-GV: 48 miles
23.   5/20 –GV-Kingman-GV: 25 miles
24.   5/21-5/29—GV-Dolan Springs-GV-BHC-Mohave Valley-LHC-Parker-Quartzsite-Yuma-Fortuna Foothills-Verrado-Sun City West-Wittmann-Wickenburg-Congress-Peeples Valley-Yarnell-Ponderosa Park-Prescott-Prescott Valley-Jerome-Clarkdale-Cottonwood-Payson-Apache Junction-Scottsdale-PHX—Apache Junction-PHX-Gilbert-PHX-Kingman-GV: 1224 miles
25.   5/30—GV-Kingman-GV: 25 miles
26.   5/31—GV-Kingman-GV-Kingman-GV: 48 miles

May Total: 4187 miles
May Gas Receipts: $973.29

27.   6/1—GV-Kingman-GV: 25 miles
28.   6/3—GV-BHC-GV: 75 miles
29.   6/6—GV-Kingman-GV: 25 miles
30.   6/8-6/10—GV-Beverly Hills-Hollywood-Orange-Hollywood-BHC-GV: 745 miles
31.   6/11-6/13—GV-PHX-NPHX-Tempe-NPHX-Yuma-Kingman-GV: 868 miles
32.   6/14—GV-Kingman-GV-Kingman: 48 miles
33.   6/15—GV-Kingman-GV: 25 miles
34.   6/18-6/21—GV-Prescott-Prescott Valley-Payson-NPHX-PHX-Mesa-Apache Junction-Prescott-Kingman-GV: 764 miles
35.   6/24-GV-Chloride-LHC-GV: 168 miles
36.   6/26-6/27—GV-NPHX-Scottsdale-Buckeye-PHX-NPHX-GV: 538 miles
June Total: 3281 miles
Quarter Total: 10,214 miles  X .44 per mile = 4,491.16 in travel mileage



Political Signage = Freedom, a Guest Column by W. John Williamson

Recently, Rep. David Schweikert--the guy I'm running against--
was interviewed on KJZZ, our local NPR station, and I agreed with what he
said.

He was talking about campaign signs and how he loves to put the signs up
and participate in that aspect of a political campaign.

I, too, share Rep. Schweikert's passion for campaign signs and the whole
process of putting them up and making them an important part of one's
campaign.

David Schweikert talked about how one's hands get cut by the baling wire
used to attach the signs to the support posts. Been there, suffered that.
He talked enthusiastically about going out and putting up signs at all
hours of the day and night. Been there, done that.

One thing that I get concerned about for myself is when I'm checking out
my signs at an intersection. I have to make sure I pay attention to my
driving and don't get in an accident.

Unfortunately, not everyone in our society understands the importance of
political campaign signs. They are a reflection of our First Amendment
rights, for one thing. People that want to put the kibosh on campaign
signs don't understand their significance. While some sign-grinches may
see political campaign signs as blight, they really show that we have
freedom in our country. That we have elections where people can vote and
choose their own leaders. We have choice in our country; we are not
dictated to. This doesn't happen in Myanmar, North Korea, Russia, or
China. We have something unique in our country that a lot of our citizens,
I believe, don't really appreciate.

Some people may laugh at this, but it's getting harder to be a political
candidate in our country. Political candidates are much more limited, for
one thing, about where they can stand to get their nomination petition
signatures. Some cities, such as Paradise Valley and now Fountain Hills,
do not allow political signs to be put up. Some property and business
owners, if a sign is on their property, do not have the decency to call up
the candidate to give him, or her, a chance to remove their sign, even
though a contact phone number must be on all the candidates' signs. These
arrogant individuals simply confiscate the signs and throw them away.

On the positive side, I'd like to share this story. A manager of a Bank of
America called me up about two weeks ago. Evidently, one of her customers
had told her that if all the political signs were not removed from her
bank branch's property, that customer was going to close their account and
take their business elsewhere. I told this manager, a courteous lady, that
I had put a sign on their property in the last election, and all had been
well. She told me that she has managed that branch for 19 years, and never
had this problem before. She told me she knows signs are expensive and
wanted to give me a chance to take my sign down myself so that I wouldn't
lose it. I went up within 30 minutes to the bank and took my sign down.

I commend this bank manager for her civility, but she is the exception.

There are candidates running with whom I disagree markedly on the
issues--David Schweikert and John Kavanagh, for example. But I would never
want them, or any other candidate, to have their freedom to put up signs
impinged upon. Rep. Schweikert has great signs; I commend him for it.

And what he said in the KJZZ NPR interview was great, too. Signs are
important in political campaigns, and I hope that they never disappear. I
share his enthusiasm for them. Some people and municipalities, however,
seem to want to sanitize their communities by eliminating all evidence of
healthy political life. These people do not understand American democracy,
nor are they helping it to thrive and be well.

If you would like to contribute to my campaign, please check out my
website at 
www.williamsonforuscongress.com. Click on "Make a Donation"
and, by means of safe and secure PayPal, dare to support your Democratic
candidate who believes in campaign signs as an expression of our First
Amendment rights, critical to the vitality of freedom and democracy in our
land.

The Future Can Be Ours if we recognize and respect the importance of
political campaign signs as an indication of our freedom of choice in
America to choose our own leaders. Democracy can be, as you've no doubt
heard before, messy; and freedom is often only achieved through a tortuous
process. Some political campaign signs are tacky; some are works of art.
Political campaigns may be raucous and uncivil; or mannerly and
respectful. Yet if we show tolerance for what some may consider this
political "circus," we may in the end see that our democracy is the
stronger for it, and that indeed, because we have put up with the signs
and the sound and fury of elections, we have saved, as Rep. Schweikert
might put it, "the Republic."

Thank you for your time.

Sincerely,
John





W John Williamson is the Democratic nominee for US House in AZ's 6th Congeressional District, He is also a high school English teacher and father.



Monday, June 30, 2014

Obligatory End-of-the-Quarter Campaign Mailer: "Daddy Needs a New Pair of Shoes!"

Sending out these fundraiser things is a gamble you know?

Like this shot here. We spent an hour figuring out which pair of my old beat up Chucks to star in the photo, then most of the day shooting 80 different shots of different pairs of shoes, mixed w a variety of campaign imagery. We passionately debated ad strategy  right over the top of what had promised to be an enjoyable lunch break and then studied 9 prototypes of format and at one point even invested, I kid you not, 35 minutes trying out umpteen variations of the pink color for the type. And then what? Our brave little emailer heads out to do battle for your attention w all the other end-of-the-quarter ads from bigger name candidates with better funded campaigns. The whole thing might just roll snake eyes.
Why do it?
Well, because we need the money, duh! But I guarantee you we get more bang for your bucks and more actual miles than most any candidate out there. Those are REAL former campaign shoes, walked ragged chasing across the district rallying Democrats and ragging on the Right. If you met me someplace it cost me gas money to get there & I was probably headed someplace else shortly.  This quarter we traveled almost thirteen thousand miles, on the road more than half the time, including one trip that included petitioning in 22 separate cities in all seven counties of the district. Why do it? Somebody has to. I am honored so many of you have supported me to fight this battle.
I want you to support my campaign because you know it is the right thing to do, because you know I am trying my best & because you have faith that things can change. You keep me funded and I will keep at it. That simple. It’s not easy and it’s not quick, but if we work we can get there.
BTW: I actually DO need new Chucks. Chuck Taylor Converse All-Star Black High-Tops, size 11, that is. & no, this is not a paid promotion for them; but it is a fairly broad hint to you, lol.
Get information on my campaign on our website: www.mikelweisser.org

WE can make a Difference

Join me.

Contribute Here:

Visit the website:

Mikel Weisser
918-234-5633
4490 Sundown Dr
So-Hi, AZ 86413
mikelweisser@gmail.com


this message paid for by Mikel Weisser for US Congress
unsubscribe here: yzurthemepark@gmail.com


Friday, June 27, 2014

Safer AZ Defendants’ Rights Conference to Feature High Profile MMJ “Outlaws”

 (6/27/14)
For Immediate Release—
Safer AZ Defendants’ Rights Conference to Feature High Profile MMJ “Outlaws”
Contact: Mikel Weisser, Executive Director, Safer Arizona
What: Defendants’ Rights Conference Featuring Billy Zonka & Billy Hayes
When: Thursday July 3, 2014
Where: Tempe’s Finest Up in Smoke smoke shop, 25 w Baseline, Suite 2, Tempe, AZ  480-755-0187



In time for his pretrial hearing Monday July 7th in Yavapai County, certified AZ medical marijuana patient Chris Martin, a celebrated chef and the founder of Billy Zonka 's edibles and the  trendy ZonkaGear clothing line, is also facing more than 125yrs of charges for creating cannabis concentrates while he had an AZ MMJ patient card. This case has generated national attention and been profiled in PHX New Times:

http://blogs.phoenixnewtimes.com/valleyfever/2012/09/zonka_bar_bust_arizonas_anti-p.php

In conjunction w Safer AZ and The Human Solution East Valley, Martin will be holding a press conference at Up in Smoke smoke shop in Tempe, Arizona to educate the public on the rights of defendants charged w cannabis offenses . Also on hand will be another celebrated AZMMJ patient being prosecuted under outrageous charges. Billy Hayes, another noted MMJ activist and prosecuted MMJ  patient, will be on the panel.
The panel will discuss the struggles mmj patients face when prosecuted and what protections are needed to be built into the upcoming 2016 citizens' initiative for legalization. Safer AZ, Arizona’s cannabis reform PAC, sponsored the 2014 AZ marijuana legalization citizens initiative and is currently working with the cannabis reform groups and national cannabis reform leader, the Marijuana Policy Project, on the public outreach and  drafting phases of the 2016 campaign.

Come to the event to share your experiences. Learn more about defendants’ rights and learn more about how you can help make marijuana legal in AZ in 2016.

Contact mikel weisser w Safer Arizona for more details:
928-234-5633
legalize@saferarizona.com
Visit our website at:
http://saferarizona.com/